June 14, 2024

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Ross Health District Awarded Medical Reserve Corps Grant

Article Presented By McDonald’s…

(Chillicothe) – Ross County Health District (RCHD) has been awarded $182,245 to coordinate Medical Reserve Corps activities in Ohio’s Southeast Central region. RCHD is one of eight regional subrecipients chosen by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Bureau of Health Preparedness (BHP) of the MRC State, Territory and Tribal Nations, Representative Organizations for Next Generation (STTRONG) regional grant to support Medical Reserve Corps efforts across Ohio. 

This funding (effective January 1, 2024, through May 31, 2025) will improve public health emergency response and increase Medical Reserve Corps volunteers throughout the region which includes Ross, Athens, Gallia, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Pike, Scioto, Vinton. 

The four overarching goals of the MRC-STTRONG grant are as follows:

1.        Prepare for future public health emergencies and disasters

2.        Manage the federal response to and recovery from public health emergencies and other disasters

3.        Improve and leverage partnerships with healthcare and public health stakeholders

4.        Ensure workforce readiness through development of innovative workplace practices

The Health District will use the funding to enhance the capacity and preparedness of the MRC units in our region, particularly by addressing the challenges of volunteer recruitment, engagement, and retention. RCHD aims to reinvigorate a robust and sustainable volunteer program that can effectively respond to public health emergencies.

RCHD’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, Tiffany Singer, will lead the regional efforts. “We are honored to receive this grant from the Ohio Department of Health, which reflects our shared commitment to the health and safety of our communities,” Singer expressed. “This funding will enable us to further strengthen public health preparedness and response capabilities, ensuring that we can effectively serve our community during times of need.”

Ross County Health Commissioner, Janelle McManis, echoes Singer’s sentiments: “We are very excited about the opportunities for expanded emergency preparedness this grant will provide, increasing our region’s resilience in crises and natural disasters.”

Local MRC volunteers are trained as part of a team and work within their community’s health, preparedness, and response infrastructures to help meet local medical and public health needs during emergencies. MRC volunteers also promote preparedness in their communities to improve everyday health, reducing potential public health risks and vulnerabilities. Volunteers participate in and support activities such as emergency preparedness and response training, emergency shelter operations and medical care, disaster cleanup and recovery support, and much more.

MRC is a national network of more than 300,000 volunteer medical professionals, public health experts, and others. MRC volunteer skill sets include but are not limited to communications, logistics, medicine, mental health, pharmaceuticals, public health, safety, and veterinary sciences. Medical backgrounds are valuable, but not required to volunteer with MRC. Community members without medical training can serve in other essential support functions. 

If you are interested in volunteering for the Medical Reserve Corp, contact Tiffany Singer at (740) 779-9652 ext. 2235 or email [email protected].

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